Lycopene might improve BPH, joint study suggests

Source : Taipei Times (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2017/09/04/2003677780)

By Lee I-chia  /  Staff reporter

433397207_8282f6bd50_z (1)

Medical research suggests that eating foods that contain lycopene — commonly found in red fruits and vegetables — can improve benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a National Taiwan University Hospital (NTUH) physician said yesterday.

The Taiwanese Association of Andrology held two talks on men’s health issues at NTUH yesterday, one about BPH — a non-cancerous condition in men in which the prostate is enlarged and often causes problems when urinating.

About half of men aged above 50 years in the nation have problems with BPH, and the likelihood of developing the condition increases with age, the association said.

An early symptom of BPH is a weakened or slower urine stream, NTUH urologist Tai Huai-ching (戴槐青) said, adding that while the normal discharge rate is about 15cc to 20cc of urine per second, mild cases of BPH can cause the rate to drop to about 10cc to 15cc per second and serious cases to lower than 10cc per second.

He said symptoms also include frequent or urgent need to urinate or inability to completely empty the bladder, which might lead to urinary tract infection or even increased risk of chronic kidney disease in serious cases.

A five-year international clinical study conducted by researchers from NTUH and the US on thousands of BPH patients above the age of 50 found that those who consumed a certain amount of lycopene showed significant improvements when urinating, association chairperson and NTUH urologist Chang Hong-chiang (張宏江) said.

The causes of BPH are mainly associated with genetic inheritance, but men who eat foods high in animal fats also have higher risk of developing the condition, he said.

Lycopene can be found in ripe tomatoes, pumpkins, carrots, papayas, grapefruits and many red fruits and vegetables, John Tung Foundation Food and Nutrition Center director Hsu Hui-yu (許惠玉) said.

However, as lycopene is a lipid-soluble compound, people might mistakenly think that the fruits and vegetables must be cooked for the body to absorb it, but it can also be absorbed when eaten raw with salad dressings, meats or nuts, as they all contain oils, she said.

The FDA is flip-flopping on its decision to let tea farmers use a worrisome chemical

CNA  Thursday, June 29, 2017, 3:12 pm TWN

Source : The China Post (http://www.chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/2017/06/29/499082/the-fda.htm)

tea-plantation-tea-farm-tea-cameron-highlands

TAIPEI, Taiwan — The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on Thursday revoked its decision to tolerate fluopyram in tea, after its previous decision to permit residue of the fungicide stirred controversy.

In line with the Council of Agriculture (COA) policy of allowing the use of a pesticide that is a mixture of fluopyram and trifloxystrobin on tea bushes, the FDA on March 15 announced that up to 6 ppm of fluopyram residue would be permitted.

The announcement immediately triggered an outcry, because fluopyram has been linked to thyroid and liver cancer in mice.

According to Pan Chih-kuan (潘志寬), head of the FDA’s Division of Food Safety, the FDA’s decision to revoke the tolerance for fluopyram was made to ease consumers’ concerns and avoid unnecessary misunderstanding.

The FDA and COA will reconsider the use of fluopyram and its residue limit and will strengthen communication with the public before a further decision is made, he said.

 

Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds

Consumption of even full-fat dairy products does not increase risk, international team of experts say

By Denis Campbell  /  The Guardian
grated-cheese-grater-cheese-dairy-product-kitchen

Consuming cheese, milk and yogurt — even full-fat versions — does not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to research that challenges the widely held belief that dairy products can damage health.

The findings, from an international team of experts, contradict the view that dairy products can be harmful because of their high saturated fat content. The experts dismiss that fear as “a misconception [and] mistaken belief.”

The results come from a new meta-analysis of 29 previous studies of whether dairy products increase the risk of death from any cause and from either serious heart problems or cardiovascular disease. The study concluded that such foodstuffs did not raise the risk of any of those events and had a “neutral” impact on human health.

“This meta-analysis showed there were no associations between total dairy, high and low-fat dairy, milk and the health outcomes including all-cause mortality, coronary heart disease or cardiovascular disease,” says the report, published in the European Journal of Epidemiology.

Ian Givens, a professor of food chain nutrition at Reading University, who was one of the researchers, said: “There’s quite a widespread but mistaken belief among the public that dairy products in general can be bad for you, but that’s a misconception. While it is a widely held belief, our research shows that that’s wrong.

“There’s been a lot of publicity over the last five to 10 years about how saturated fats increase the risk of cardiovascular disease and a belief has grown up that they must increase the risk, but they don’t.”

However, the government’s health advisers urged consumers to continue to exercise caution about eating too many products high in saturated fat and to stick to low-fat versions instead.

“Dairy products form an important part of a healthy balanced diet; however, many are high in saturated fat and salt. We’re all consuming too much of both, increasing our risk of heart disease,” said a spokesman for Public Health England. “We recommend choosing lower-fat varieties of milk and dairy products or eating smaller amounts to reduce saturated fat and salt in the diet.”

Givens and colleagues from Reading, Copenhagen University in Denmark and Wageningen University in the Netherlands analyzed 29 studies involving 938,465 participants from around the world undertaken over the last 35 years, including five done in the UK.

“No associations were found for total (high-fat/low-fat) dairy and milk with the health outcomes of mortality, CHD or CVD,” they said. In fact, they added, fermented dairy products may potentially slightly lower the risk of having a heart attack or stroke.

Doctors, public health experts and official healthy eating guidelines have for many years identified saturated fats as potentially harmful for heart and cardiovascular health and advised consumers to minimize their intake.

That has led to consumers increasingly buying lower-fat versions of dairy products. For example, 85 percent of all milk sold in the UK is now semi-skimmed or skimmed.

Givens said consumers were shunning full-fat versions of cheese, milk or yogurt in the mistaken view that they could harm their health. Young people, especially young women, were now often drinking too little milk as a result of that concern, which could damage the development of their bones and lead to conditions in later life including osteoporosis, or brittle bones, he said. Consuming too little milk can deprive young people of calcium.

Pregnant women who drank too little milk could be increasing the risk of their child having neuro-developmental difficulties, which could affect their cognitive abilities and stunt their growth, Givens added.

The most recent National Diet and Nutrition Survey, the government’s occasional snapshot of eating habits, found that dairy products, including butter, accounted for the highest proportion of saturated fat consumption in British diets — 27 percent, compared with meat’s 24 percent. But if butter was not counted then dairy products together were the second largest source of saturated fat, at 22 percent.

Saturated fat is a vital part of diet. The NDNS found that adults typically got 34.6 percent of their total energy from fats as a whole, just below the 35 percent the government recommends. However, while total fat consumption was just within target, saturated fats still made up an unhealthily large proportion of total food energy — 12.6 percent, against the recommended maximum of 11 percent.

Givens said: “Our meta-analysis included an unusually large number of participants. We are confident that our results are robust and accurate.”

The research was part-funded by the three pro-dairy groups — Global Dairy Platform, Dairy Research Institute and Dairy Australia — but they had no influence over it, the paper said. Givens is an adviser to the Food Standards Agency.

Source: Taipei Times (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/feat/archives/2017/05/15/2003670605/2)

 

TATCM NEWS | 最新消息 »

Lycopene might improve BPH, joint study suggests

Lycopene might improve BPH, joint study suggests

Source : Taipei Times (http://www.taipeitimes.com/News/taiwan/archives/2017/09/04/2003677780) By Lee I-chia  /  Staff reporter Medical research suggests that...

 
The FDA is flip-flopping on its decision to let tea farmers use a worrisome chemical

The FDA is flip-flopping on its decision to let tea farmers use a worrisome chemical

CNA  Thursday, June 29, 2017, 3:12 pm TWN Source : The China Post (http://www.chinapost.com.tw/taiwan/2017/06/29/499082/the-fda.htm) TAIPEI, Taiwan — The...

 
Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds

Eating cheese does not raise risk of heart attack or stroke, study finds

Consumption of even full-fat dairy products does not increase risk, international team of experts say By Denis Campbell  /  The Guardian Consuming cheese, milk...

 
Stressed? Better lay off that fried chicken, ice cream, chocolate bars…

Stressed? Better lay off that fried chicken, ice cream, chocolate bars…

Source: China Post (http://www.chinapost.com.tw/health/2017/05/09/497063/Stressed%3F-Better.htm) The China Post news staff  Tuesday, May 9, 2017, 5:02 pm TWN tress...